Posts tagged ‘speaker’

The Number 13!

Very excited about this! I’m #13 (how appropriate) in this BCBusiness Magazine spread on “Vancouver’s Social Media Innovators” by Nordica Photography.

It’s a tremendous honour to be in a spread with so many brilliant and amazing people.


Thank you, Cole Roberts and Jakob Granqvist for the (as promised) pain-free shoot – and lovely write-up.

April 5, 2010 at 6:00 am Leave a comment

Presentation: Fun with Psychology, Sociology and Social Media

Here’s a talk I gave on Tuesday for “Vancouver Social Media Professionals Meetup” with a title that just rolls off your tongue: “Fun with Psychology and Sociology – and how it relates to Social Media“.

If you can’t garner much about content via this slideshow, just assume it was brilliant. Or wait for the series I’ll be writing on the subject on OneDegree.

March 5, 2010 at 4:00 pm Leave a comment

Talk Amongst Yourselves – or Not So Much?

I recently attended SlideRocket’s webinar where Cliff Atkinson presented “The Backchannel: A Presenter’s Nightmare or Dream Come True?“.  The session addressed:

  1. Yes, this is happening: people are Tweeting at conferences
  2. Specific examples of Twitter revolts during talks
  3. The value of engaging the backchannel (i.e. Twitter conversations during a talk) and how to do so more.

I’ve given, and attended, a number of talks and I have conflicting sentiments about the Twitter stream during presentations.

As a speaker, I am excited by the immediate feedback. Seeing a number of comments about a talk right after giving it is a wild and, oddly, comforting feeling. (I did something today, I think, and this proves it!) It is interesting to see which points, topics or stories particularly resonated with the audience. On the flip-side, I sometimes feel a bit dismayed when seeing something I said out of context. The context is often necessary to comprehend that what I said was meant in jest, or in order to render the statement “sensical”.

As a participant, the desire to connect with others in the session, to share the information with those not there, or to simply covey, “I am here in this session, doing something today”. (If you’re getting the sense that I may need to really prove to myself and others that I am accomplishing something, you may be on the right track.) At times, the information being broadcast helps those paying attention on Twitter get a sense of the presentation and its overriding points and message. But the conversation also takes away from the content of the talk, and from actually listening.

Here are just some of the pros and cons as I see them.  Please feel free to contribute what you see as pluses or minuses.

Cons

Tremendous Oversimplification. 140 characters is not enough to tell a story, and sometimes not even enough to explain a point made.

Out of Context. As stated above, jokes or flip statement are the easiest for those not present to read and misinterpret. (“She thinks slaughterhouses are sexy?!”)

Missed information
.  The focus can become not on learning – but on sharing what you just learnt.  And it’s easy to miss what the speaker is saying next while attempting to truncate their last statement.  And, as Chris Pirillo put it so well: “The problem with people using Twitter during a presentation is that they are paying more attention to the voice that is in their head than they are to the voice on the stage.”

Distraction
.  An embarrassing story of my spaciness here (but we’re friends right?) :  While at TEDxVancouver I tried to tweet occasionally, to mention that I like a talk or to put out a quick point.  The conference had a few technical difficulties where some videos took a few moments to play etc.  And so, after coming back from one of the breaks, I got on the Twitter and tweeted happily away.  I heard some music play, and assumed they had switched it on while they got organized.  When, after a few moments, I heard clapping the realization dawned on me in a painful way. The music had been a performance. Live.  And I had missed it.

Noise/Randomness.  Ah, yes, noise.  The internet, and social media by extension, has that in fair supply.  While watching (or capturing) comments on a particular talk, you will see information and notes about the talk, but you might also see things like “Trying to get to #BobSmith’s session, but stuck in transit.  Wow, BCTransit bites!”.  While this message might be (arguably) relevant and (certainly) true, it contributes nothing to the discourse/feed.

Too Easy to Criticize. It’s been said that “Everyone’s a critic”.  And Twitter makes that all too easy.  It’s there, it’s a channel to the public, and some don’t censor themselves enough.  While these people are in the minority, the notion that everyone has a relevant opinion gives voice, quite literally to unnecessary and impulsive comments (“How could he be wearing that ‘Death Cab for Cutie’ shirt to a talk?!” or “I knew about the experiment he just referred to. Next.”)

Pros

Interactivity.  If properly integrated into the talk, as Cliff Atkinson was mentioning, the result can (in some capacity) be a more engaged talk, and hence a more engaging talk.  The questions, concerns and audience viewpoints taken into account might result in a stronger presentation – and one that really speaks to the people present.    At the very least, you, as a presenter, can be aware of the concerns of the audience (this might work especially well if the session is one that breaks off – i.e. perhaps has a workshop and you can see what the audience is needing, missing.)

Stimulation.  A good talk – like an insightful book – should occasionally take your brain on tangents. You should sometimes think about 1) is this true? I agree/disagree. 2) that reminds me of this experience I had/ heard about. There are times a speaker’s points will inspire trains of thought.  This means notes and sometimes dialogue (easily accessed through Twitter/Backchannel. (Now, this may well be selfish of me: Talking time away from speaker to extrapolate a blog post. But I take my moments of inspiration where I can get them).

And, least I be misunderstood, I do love that there are people who tweet and, especially, take notes.  Their hard work allows me to really listen to the talk – and be assured that there will be a place to find the important points when I later (without fail) forget 90% of what was said.

Share your rants and raves below, if so inclined.

Share/Bookmark

Talk Amongst Yourselves – or Not So Much” by Monica Hamburg

Post url:  http://monicahamburg.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/talk-amongst-yourselves-or-not-so-much/

January 28, 2010 at 5:15 pm 1 comment

Take Me To Your Interviewer

Apparently, when I get interviewed, I look like I’m being hypnotized for cult activities.  Or perhaps it just seems that way from this freeze frame:

Click above or here to see an interview I did in Toronto with Get Involved about Social Media and Social Change.

November 17, 2009 at 10:36 am 3 comments

Some Social Media Tips

I’ll be presenting at the Vancouver Financial Services Marketing Meetup next week – and I figure I’d address some “best practices” in my talk.   Here are a few (note: I wrote this originally for an online interview).

Tips

1) Communicate with people, don’t just use the sites as a 1-way bullhorn.

2) Be honest – if you’re affiliated with a product/company don’t pretend your endorsement comes out of the blue

3) Check out what people are saying about you and your company using Google Alerts and other tools

4) If you’re on Twitter, take the time to get to know people, to help and communicate.  Self-promotion should be only a very small part of what you put out there.

5) Make social media a part of your life rather than trying to fit it in (e.g. make twittering and posting a natural extension of how you communicate)

How has Social Media helped me?

I have been asked to speak at conferences because people have come across my blogs. I’m excited when they’ve read my blogs beforehand because gives them an insight into who I am. Oddly enough, I’ve had a few people say they were booking me just as much for the fact that I’m funny as for my knowledge –  they wanted someone who could brings humor to the presentation.

Biggest Mistakes

1)  Ignoring it altogether – hoping it’s a fad

2) Seeing it as advertising rather than communication

3) Revealing too much – or two little (it’s beneficial to give people an idea of the person behind the business)

Best Networkers

They allow themselves to be 3-dimensional.  They reveal some aspects of their personality and admit their mistakes.  They naturally like people and genuinely want to have discourses and meet others.  They give and add value to the community.  I think a sense of fun and playfulness also helpful in the space.

Tips for success

1) Structure: You have to commit to whatever site or site(s) you’re networking on, commit to going there, to posting, and to communicating on a regular schedule.  If you disappear for a long time people will figure you’ve left.

2) It takes time.  You won’t suddenly get people throwing money at you.  But if you invest your time you will eventually see the results of your efforts.

3) Think of it as networking at an event or party.  You let your hair down a bit, and meet people and chat.  Using the same example, parties don’t always lead to a business deal that evening, but nurturing the connections might eventually bear fruit.

4) Try to have fun with it – even though it is, in a sense, marketing.  If you enjoy the communication, it will be less of a labor and more easy to incorporate into your life.

If I had to pick only 1 social network

Twitter.  It’s faster and easier to communicate and generally more people see the message.  Also you can incorporate other elements (link to pictures, blog posts etc.)  I think you still need a blog, but you can communicate every day on Twitter, whereas you may not have the time or energy to write daily in-depth posts on your blog.

How to use

Use YouTube to showcase yourself briefly and to give others a chance to see “real life” you.  Use Facebook as a general communication tool – it allows you to update your status, post videos, talk to people, organize events etc.  Plus, most people are on it.  Use Twitter to communicate a few times a day.  Your blog is great for ideas, thoughts about your business/industry, to allow clients to keep up with you and your work and activities and for general longer-form communication than microblogs (e.g. Twitter).

What tips do you have re: best practices, that you think I should share?

___  ___  ___

P.S. I recently did an interview with the Casual Encounters blog (primarily about my other blog)

July 6, 2009 at 12:45 pm 5 comments

Interview with Chicks Who Click

In addition to next week’s presentations at My Charity Connects in Toronto, I’ll also be speaking at Clicks who Click here in Vancouver on June 27th.

There’s a quick interview with me posted on their blog.

June 3, 2009 at 4:15 pm Leave a comment

LinkedIn – Are You FeelIn’ It?

Confession: I don’t use LinkedIn well or often. Frankly, when I got on it just felt too “stuffy”, and I still get that sense.

While Twitter and Facebook feel lively and energetic (the interface, the way the tool works, the way people interact), LinkedIn feels like one of those sterile networking events where people are trying to make contacts but there’s no actual engagement or conversation

LinkedIn smurfs

(If only Linkedin were as interesting as this "LinkedIn smurfs" photo by 99zeros

I like the “Introductions” concept.  If you’re looking to make contact with a particular person and you discover that he/she is only separated by a degree or two, it makes sense to try to connect .  Of course, in that case, I’d simply find out who to contact using Linkedin – and then Google to find the person’s email.  I could then shoot them an email, mentioning our mutual connection – without going through Linkedin’s own (unlovable) messaging system…

Other than that, I haven’t found much on Linkedin that you couldn’t do in a more personal and engaging way on another site (mainly Twitter or Facebook).

But, because I don’t like something, doesn’t necessarily make it irrelevant.  (I wish! Physical Sciences seem to have stuck around, regardless.  Go figure.)

Many find LinkedIn extremely useful.  I have a friend who swears by the site. It’s been invaluable for him in terms of  making connections.  And while I relish the ability to be casual and “myself” online, I recognize some don’t believe business and personal should mix as much as most social sites encourage/accept.  Especially if you find Facebook to be too personal (“Who cares what interpretive dance performance my acquaintance is going to…?” ), LinkedIn can be an especially appealing social networking tool.

So, in the interest of fairness, let’s look at what LinkedIn can actually do.

It gives you the ability to (among other things):

  • see who your contacts and friends are connected to in a business sense (e.g. who do they know well and have worked with).
  • research people/companies (“What’s that person like to work with? Should/could I work with them? Looks like some people I know have worked with her – I’ll ask them.”)
  • request and receive public recommendations (that never hurts)
  • mention what you are up to (using the “status”/”what are you working on?” update.)
  • ask for advice from the Linkedin populace as a whole, or from your friends.
  • request a contact make an introduction to someone in their connections with whom you’d like to establish contact.

Recently Linkedin has been making strides to make the platform more appetizing, adding SlideShare and blog post integration (and other applications) as well as “Groups

And my problem with the site “not being fun”, is in a sense, missing the point.  It’s likely not supposed to be.

As Bernard Lunn writes on RedWriteWeb:

“We want to spend as little time as possible so that we can get the job done, get off our computers, and have a life. LinkedIn is the most efficient place to hunt for customers and employees. It is the first real change in productivity for those who work on the front lines of business.”

LinkedIn also has an “Events” feature – and you certainly can see (and be apprised of) the events your friends are attending – but there’s more.  It trumps the usual events features by offering:

“…recommendations based on the contents of your profile” in your newsfeed. (Marshall Kirkpatrick on Mashable.)

And in How to Get the Most Out of LinkedIn by Brian Wallace remarks that:

“The old adage that “it isn’t what you know, it’s who you know” still holds value. LinkedIn takes this thought one step further, making it “who you will know soon to be of utmost importance.” Using LinkedIn, I’ve trained small businesses to spread their wings and get connected with companies that they might otherwise have thought were beyond reach, and to the persons they were looking for in those companies.”

Indeed, it is often more efficient (and more exact) to search for contacts at a company using Linkedin then to use the “About the Team” page (assuming they even have one) on their website.

Further, LinkedIn lets you know where your connections are now – even if you’ve lost touch or are out-of-the-loop: once you upload your address book, it checks to see who’s on board and you could reconnect with people for whom you have outdated emails:

“I had old emails for people who had changed jobs; LinkedIn automatically showed me where they work now (I assume based on email forwarding).” (Bernard Lunn on RedWriteWeb)

So, clearly, some people are getting value out of LinkedIn.  Are you?
____

Stay tuned: in the next post, I’ll be looking at Linkedin for NonProfits. Update: Well, no, I won’t.  It’s just off the priority list right now – but I did find a great “A Visual Guide To LinkedIn For Job Hunters” and since I feel that networking is a bit like Job Hunting, it’s appropriate. Or maybe it isn’t and I just love the tips and visuals in it. Your call.

May 7, 2009 at 1:06 pm 5 comments

Links for Artists

I have been lax about posting items of particular interest to artists. Mea culpa.

Chonburi International Art Exhibition - Marshall Astor - Year of the Comet - Painting Helpers from Friend Art

Photo Credit: Marshall Astor - Food Pornographer "Chonburi International Art Exhibition - Marshall Astor - Year of the Comet - Painting Helpers from Friend Art"

Here are a few enlightening articles I’ve come across:

David Spark‘s Mashable post, 12 Inspiring Stories of Successful Social Networkers, has an amazing example of the value of twittering for your character:

“Having blown all their budget on production, “My Two Fans” had no money for advertising, so off a friend’s recommendation, Swatek decided to start Twittering as her character, Kate Maxwell (@KateMaxwell). To get some fodder for Twittering and to find her audience, Swatek began following businesses and people that could relate to her show, such as dating sites, single women, girl power groups, fan clubs, etc.”

(Note: more on the topic of Twittering for characters on this previous post and on Gillian Shaw’s story.)

Beth Kanter offers the amazingly comprehensive post “Arts Organizations and Artists 2.0: Social Media for Arts People” which also mentions the value of using a blog as a showcase:

“For individual artists, a blog can also help sell or promote their work. Here’s some artists personal blogs that support their gallery sites where they sell their work — A Planet Named Janet, Self VS Self, PaMdora’s Box and Jen Lemen.”

& Jacob Morgan and Josh Peters recently released their (free) Social Media for Authors Ebook – chock full of useful suggestions, e.g. using Scribd:

“…upload any documents you want to share. Views, downloads, likes, comments, and favorites stats are plainly displayed on the page so you can see how popular the document has been. This can be used for anything from posting up a teaser to your next book to providing a free downloadable short story as a fan bonus. The settings for the documents (like if they can be downloaded or not) are easily set and Scribd serves as a great way to get your writing out to other people.”

Any other cool stuff you’ve come across lately?  Please share!

May 7, 2009 at 11:19 am 3 comments

Overview: Vancouver Digital Week

I’m very excited to be working on social media promotion for Vancouver Digital Week!

One of the reason I’m jazzed about this series is because I loved  last year’s Convergence and Vidfest.  I was particularly impressed with James McCraken‘s talk as well as the one on Alternate Reality Games from 42 Entertainment.  I love events that allow for the soaking up of information and siphoning off great minds – and there was no shortage of that last year.  It looks like this year will be pretty formidable as well.

What is Vancouver Digital Week?
(Yes, I will be asking and answering my own questions, btw – just like that self-important guy you met last week.)

Vancouver Digital Week, which runs from May 11 – 14, 2009 (mostly at the Vancouver Exhibition and Convention Centre – West – i.e. the new one at 1055 Canada Place), is a series of digital media events for people involved in, or interested in, the following industries:

  • games and digital entertainment
  • social media
  • interactive design, animation and VFX

It includes international business match-making, big picture conference sessions, high-level seminars and workshops, as well as loads of networking parties.

You can register for an event by going to the particular event site (see below).

What events are part of Vancouver Digital Week?

Vancouver Digital Week - Events

(Click on the photo to see notes  – including dates and websites)

What’s especially cool about this event?

I’m glad you asked!

  • DAVID PLOUFFE, Campaign Manager, Obama for America will be the keynote speaker at Convergence.
  • There’s a 2-day Game Developers conference
  • nextMEDIA Vancouver offers a program which connects the digital worlds of Music, Advertising and Broadcast (including sessions that discuss self-promotion for artists through technology, which I’m particularly psyched about)
  • New Media BC’s PopVox Awards which honour the best of BC’s Digital Media Industry.  It is a people’s choice contest so the winners are determined by the audience.
    • You can purchase tickets for the gala on the New Media BC site.
    • And you can vote for your faves – but only until tomorrow (April 30th)!  – Go to the  Popvox site to vote (click on a category to see the entries – and you can vote for as many).
    • There also 4 Individual Standout Awards that you can nominate people for (though these winners will be decided by a jury. )
  • And much more.

Where can I find information Vancouver Digital Week?

Update: Tags! Please tag Vancouver Digital Week as #vdw09 on Twitter, and vdw09 on Youtube, Flickr etc. (you can also add the following re: Popvox  #popvox09 on Twitter and popvox09 on Youtube, Flickr etc.)

Thanks all!

April 29, 2009 at 4:14 pm 1 comment

April 24, 2009 Week in Review – on One Degree

My “Mistakes, Mayhem and Music – April 24, 2009 Week in Review” is now up on One Degree.

You can read it there. It’s funky, fly and fresh ;)

April 24, 2009 at 10:32 am Leave a comment

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Monica Hamburg – Who Am I?

Good question (I wonder this all the time).
Linkedin profile is: here.
Find out more here.

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