Posts tagged ‘actor’

LinkedIn – Are You FeelIn’ It?

Confession: I don’t use LinkedIn well or often. Frankly, when I got on it just felt too “stuffy”, and I still get that sense.

While Twitter and Facebook feel lively and energetic (the interface, the way the tool works, the way people interact), LinkedIn feels like one of those sterile networking events where people are trying to make contacts but there’s no actual engagement or conversation

LinkedIn smurfs

(If only Linkedin were as interesting as this "LinkedIn smurfs" photo by 99zeros

I like the “Introductions” concept.  If you’re looking to make contact with a particular person and you discover that he/she is only separated by a degree or two, it makes sense to try to connect .  Of course, in that case, I’d simply find out who to contact using Linkedin – and then Google to find the person’s email.  I could then shoot them an email, mentioning our mutual connection – without going through Linkedin’s own (unlovable) messaging system…

Other than that, I haven’t found much on Linkedin that you couldn’t do in a more personal and engaging way on another site (mainly Twitter or Facebook).

But, because I don’t like something, doesn’t necessarily make it irrelevant.  (I wish! Physical Sciences seem to have stuck around, regardless.  Go figure.)

Many find LinkedIn extremely useful.  I have a friend who swears by the site. It’s been invaluable for him in terms of  making connections.  And while I relish the ability to be casual and “myself” online, I recognize some don’t believe business and personal should mix as much as most social sites encourage/accept.  Especially if you find Facebook to be too personal (“Who cares what interpretive dance performance my acquaintance is going to…?” ), LinkedIn can be an especially appealing social networking tool.

So, in the interest of fairness, let’s look at what LinkedIn can actually do.

It gives you the ability to (among other things):

  • see who your contacts and friends are connected to in a business sense (e.g. who do they know well and have worked with).
  • research people/companies (“What’s that person like to work with? Should/could I work with them? Looks like some people I know have worked with her – I’ll ask them.”)
  • request and receive public recommendations (that never hurts)
  • mention what you are up to (using the “status”/”what are you working on?” update.)
  • ask for advice from the Linkedin populace as a whole, or from your friends.
  • request a contact make an introduction to someone in their connections with whom you’d like to establish contact.

Recently Linkedin has been making strides to make the platform more appetizing, adding SlideShare and blog post integration (and other applications) as well as “Groups

And my problem with the site “not being fun”, is in a sense, missing the point.  It’s likely not supposed to be.

As Bernard Lunn writes on RedWriteWeb:

“We want to spend as little time as possible so that we can get the job done, get off our computers, and have a life. LinkedIn is the most efficient place to hunt for customers and employees. It is the first real change in productivity for those who work on the front lines of business.”

LinkedIn also has an “Events” feature – and you certainly can see (and be apprised of) the events your friends are attending – but there’s more.  It trumps the usual events features by offering:

“…recommendations based on the contents of your profile” in your newsfeed. (Marshall Kirkpatrick on Mashable.)

And in How to Get the Most Out of LinkedIn by Brian Wallace remarks that:

“The old adage that “it isn’t what you know, it’s who you know” still holds value. LinkedIn takes this thought one step further, making it “who you will know soon to be of utmost importance.” Using LinkedIn, I’ve trained small businesses to spread their wings and get connected with companies that they might otherwise have thought were beyond reach, and to the persons they were looking for in those companies.”

Indeed, it is often more efficient (and more exact) to search for contacts at a company using Linkedin then to use the “About the Team” page (assuming they even have one) on their website.

Further, LinkedIn lets you know where your connections are now – even if you’ve lost touch or are out-of-the-loop: once you upload your address book, it checks to see who’s on board and you could reconnect with people for whom you have outdated emails:

“I had old emails for people who had changed jobs; LinkedIn automatically showed me where they work now (I assume based on email forwarding).” (Bernard Lunn on RedWriteWeb)

So, clearly, some people are getting value out of LinkedIn.  Are you?
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Stay tuned: in the next post, I’ll be looking at Linkedin for NonProfits. Update: Well, no, I won’t.  It’s just off the priority list right now – but I did find a great “A Visual Guide To LinkedIn For Job Hunters” and since I feel that networking is a bit like Job Hunting, it’s appropriate. Or maybe it isn’t and I just love the tips and visuals in it. Your call.

May 7, 2009 at 1:06 pm 5 comments

Links for Artists

I have been lax about posting items of particular interest to artists. Mea culpa.

Chonburi International Art Exhibition - Marshall Astor - Year of the Comet - Painting Helpers from Friend Art

Photo Credit: Marshall Astor - Food Pornographer "Chonburi International Art Exhibition - Marshall Astor - Year of the Comet - Painting Helpers from Friend Art"

Here are a few enlightening articles I’ve come across:

David Spark‘s Mashable post, 12 Inspiring Stories of Successful Social Networkers, has an amazing example of the value of twittering for your character:

“Having blown all their budget on production, “My Two Fans” had no money for advertising, so off a friend’s recommendation, Swatek decided to start Twittering as her character, Kate Maxwell (@KateMaxwell). To get some fodder for Twittering and to find her audience, Swatek began following businesses and people that could relate to her show, such as dating sites, single women, girl power groups, fan clubs, etc.”

(Note: more on the topic of Twittering for characters on this previous post and on Gillian Shaw’s story.)

Beth Kanter offers the amazingly comprehensive post “Arts Organizations and Artists 2.0: Social Media for Arts People” which also mentions the value of using a blog as a showcase:

“For individual artists, a blog can also help sell or promote their work. Here’s some artists personal blogs that support their gallery sites where they sell their work — A Planet Named Janet, Self VS Self, PaMdora’s Box and Jen Lemen.”

& Jacob Morgan and Josh Peters recently released their (free) Social Media for Authors Ebook – chock full of useful suggestions, e.g. using Scribd:

“…upload any documents you want to share. Views, downloads, likes, comments, and favorites stats are plainly displayed on the page so you can see how popular the document has been. This can be used for anything from posting up a teaser to your next book to providing a free downloadable short story as a fan bonus. The settings for the documents (like if they can be downloaded or not) are easily set and Scribd serves as a great way to get your writing out to other people.”

Any other cool stuff you’ve come across lately?  Please share!

May 7, 2009 at 11:19 am 3 comments

Overview: Vancouver Digital Week

I’m very excited to be working on social media promotion for Vancouver Digital Week!

One of the reason I’m jazzed about this series is because I loved  last year’s Convergence and Vidfest.  I was particularly impressed with James McCraken‘s talk as well as the one on Alternate Reality Games from 42 Entertainment.  I love events that allow for the soaking up of information and siphoning off great minds – and there was no shortage of that last year.  It looks like this year will be pretty formidable as well.

What is Vancouver Digital Week?
(Yes, I will be asking and answering my own questions, btw – just like that self-important guy you met last week.)

Vancouver Digital Week, which runs from May 11 – 14, 2009 (mostly at the Vancouver Exhibition and Convention Centre – West – i.e. the new one at 1055 Canada Place), is a series of digital media events for people involved in, or interested in, the following industries:

  • games and digital entertainment
  • social media
  • interactive design, animation and VFX

It includes international business match-making, big picture conference sessions, high-level seminars and workshops, as well as loads of networking parties.

You can register for an event by going to the particular event site (see below).

What events are part of Vancouver Digital Week?

Vancouver Digital Week - Events

(Click on the photo to see notes  – including dates and websites)

What’s especially cool about this event?

I’m glad you asked!

  • DAVID PLOUFFE, Campaign Manager, Obama for America will be the keynote speaker at Convergence.
  • There’s a 2-day Game Developers conference
  • nextMEDIA Vancouver offers a program which connects the digital worlds of Music, Advertising and Broadcast (including sessions that discuss self-promotion for artists through technology, which I’m particularly psyched about)
  • New Media BC’s PopVox Awards which honour the best of BC’s Digital Media Industry.  It is a people’s choice contest so the winners are determined by the audience.
    • You can purchase tickets for the gala on the New Media BC site.
    • And you can vote for your faves – but only until tomorrow (April 30th)!  – Go to the  Popvox site to vote (click on a category to see the entries – and you can vote for as many).
    • There also 4 Individual Standout Awards that you can nominate people for (though these winners will be decided by a jury. )
  • And much more.

Where can I find information Vancouver Digital Week?

Update: Tags! Please tag Vancouver Digital Week as #vdw09 on Twitter, and vdw09 on Youtube, Flickr etc. (you can also add the following re: Popvox  #popvox09 on Twitter and popvox09 on Youtube, Flickr etc.)

Thanks all!

April 29, 2009 at 4:14 pm 1 comment

April 24, 2009 Week in Review – on One Degree

My “Mistakes, Mayhem and Music – April 24, 2009 Week in Review” is now up on One Degree.

You can read it there. It’s funky, fly and fresh ;)

April 24, 2009 at 10:32 am Leave a comment

Blogging for Rupiahs

I just read an excellent post by Penelope Trunk “8 Reasons Why You Won’t Make Money from Your Blog” which begins:

“I am actually shocked at how ubiquitous the idea is that blogging is a get-rich-quick scheme. Or even a get-rich-slowly scheme. It’s not. Blogging is a great career tool for creating opportunities for yourself.”

Thank you.  I have a brilliant friend who consistently asks me, “So are you making money yet from your blog?” When I try to explain something like, “Well, not directly, I use the blog as a marketing tool” he looks at me each time like I had just announced I was going to give up all my worldly possessions and go run a lemonade stand.

Here’s the thing. I enjoy blogging – and both of my blogs have very separate purposes – neither of which involves making money directly from the writing.

I also feel it’s OK to not make money from your blog. Getting income from your blog involves a myriad of steps including building an audience (a huge undertaking), writing very, very regularly, devoting almost full-time attention to the blog alone and much, much more.  If writing a blog was satisfying enough for me to write full-time, and if I sincerely believed I could come up with decent material daily, and if I wanted to devote my energy to building a following rather than doing the work I like to do and leading the life I want (which sometimes involves stepping away from the computer), the story would be different.

As it is, my blog goals aren’t directly monetary.  With that in mind, here are just some things a blog can do:

  • Establish your authority on a subject (I recently got a speaking gig through someone finding my blog)IMG_0521
  • Make friends & Connect with people like you
  • Engage in interesting discussion/Learn from others
  • Show yourself as 3 dimensional
  • Keep people up-to-date with what you’re doing (useful for all, especially artists with a following)

I have to admit that anytime someone comments here, or riffs on something I’ve written on DOL, or tells me I’ve made them laugh – it, in all sincerity, makes my day.  Which has loads of non-monetary value for me.

Now, I have to sign off.  There’s a lemonade stand that’s not going to build itself.

April 21, 2009 at 1:17 pm 3 comments

Indie Film 2.0 now on One Degree

Back from holidays! Ahhhh, Bali was bliss.

I’ll be posting again soon.  In the meantime, should you wish to read “Indie Film 2.0 – How Social Media is Empowering Independent Filmmakers” (My most recent post on One Degree) – well, I won’t fight you :)

April 5, 2009 at 2:46 am 2 comments

Integrating Twitter into Your Life

When I mention Twitter to people not on it, they often say they simply have no idea what they would tweet about.  The best advice I think I give people is:

Find a way to make conversing on Twitter a part of your life.

If you view Twitter as an open communication channel (to your friends and beyond) that you can simply tap in anytime you like – that understanding can make the process quite natural – and possibly less intimidating.

What to talk about?*

Consider this, in a given day, do you sometimes:

  • See something interesting and think “I have to remember to tell my friend about this!”
  • Read an intriguing article or news item on the web?
  • Have an odd experience? (At the library? On transit?)
  • Do something that might interest one or more other human

Any of these can make interesting tweets and give people insight into your life.  Which is sort of the point.

Privacy?

Everyone’s line of privacy or disclosure is different.  I am very private about certain things, and seemingly reckless when it comes to others.  But I’m actually fairly tactical. I know what I’m OK with people knowing and hearing from me.***

The spectrum is quite broad.  You have to gage what you are comfortable disclosing and what you think (and here’s a key thing) people you want to interact with would want to know.  Some post mostly about business, Some mostly personal.  I think aiming for some balance on this is great.  Allowing others to have a window into your personal life and thoughts is useful – it helps establish relationships.

I’ve found that when I met twitters in real life the ice was already broken.  It was far easier to have conversations from a point at which we already kind of knew each other.


How Much to Disclose
?

And being interesting and intriguing helps maintains people’s gaze.  But how interesting…?

If you want to open your circle of friends/followers, and so keep your tweets unsecured (read: public), you are for all intents and purposes, in public. Even if you only have 20 people following, anyone can check out your page and a search can easily turn up your tweet.

So, here’s my line (and, again, mine alone):  If it’s something I would be comfortable saying at a party, it passes the test.

How Much is Too Much

In real life, revealing too much can make even broadminded strangers uncomfortable.

Consider these examples:****

Just at the bank… Why do I always end up behind the guy who is making all his deposits for the year?“= Good

Had an abortion this week.“= Bad

or

Dating can be so frustrating sometimes.” = Nice Break-the-Ice Level

I’m going through a divorce and my wife is making me sleep our backyard.” = Awkward Glass-Shattering Level

or

Hey Tom: Time for Coffee Today?” = Yes.

Hey Tom: You are a DECEPTIVE motherfucker! Why aren’t you calling me back?” = No.

istock_000007178358xsmall1

Again, this is just my opinion.

Wait – No, it’s not.

________

Notes
:

*(More suggestions about what to tweet about here and here)

**These you can even text it (or email) from your phone, if you like) as it happens!

***(or at least I think I do:)

****While I have heard of something similar to the third example happening on Twitter, the second was uttered by a guy who I just met for a dialect coaching  session and the first was said to me (rather cheerily, in fact, by a girl I didn’t know in a film criticism class.  (I think I asked if she wanted a french fry.)

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Integrating Twitter into Your Life” by Monica Hamburg

March 12, 2009 at 9:00 am 2 comments

Where In The World is Monica Hamburg?

I always loved the “Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego ” game – especially because the fugitive would run around carrying the flag of the country he was in.  Now that’s good criminal thinking…  where-in-the-world-is-monica-hamburg

Me Like the Internet is me liking the vacation until early April.  So, it’s going to be a bit quiet over here.  Though, I do have a posts or two keyed up to go up while I’m away.

If you really miss me (hey, a girl can dream), you can check out my humor blog – though that one is less informative, more deranged and generally NSFW. (Tempted, yet?)   I have weekly posts keyed up on that blog – which proves that being funny is much easier than being smart.

RSS:  If you simply come to this website to check to see when I have new content, consider subscribing (See “subscribe in a reader” with the orange button – it’s in the sidebar to the right, and about 5 inches above this sentence. Look right – there you go.)  That way the content will come to you.  If you don’t know an RSS from the FCC, I still love you, so here’s the Common Craft video to keep you up to snuff:

One Degree:  Is a fantastic blog full of insight from some smart minds.  The previous sentence notwithstanding, and, if the post I wrote last night in the wee hours makes any sense at all, I’ll have a piece about Indie Film on there in the next bit. (If you want to subscribe to OneDegree click here. My page is here, btw).

Save the Great Bear Rainforest

Some of you remember this cause from when I was working on the related “Bear Your Soul” contest.

Now, the campaign continues until March 31st so please consider sending a message to the government of British Columbia, urging them to keep their promise to concerned citizens in BC and around the world by visiting this page and signing the online petition.

More information:

The Great Bear Rainforest is the largest tract of intact coastal temperate rainforest left on Earth. It comprises over 30,000 square miles–about the size of Austria. It’s home to three kinds of bears (grizzly, black and the rare spirit bear), six million migratory birds, 3000 genetically distinct salmon stocks and many species of plants unique to the region.

Two years ago, the province of British Columbia committed to protecting this region under a new conservancy. All the stakeholders–the provincial government, logging companies, First Nations and environmentalists–agreed to a new approach to resource planning developed by an independent team of scientists, and committed to its implementation by March 31, 2009.

While some progress has been made, BC must still initiate a regional plan to ensure conservation of these critical ecosystems.

Further information at Savethegreatbear.org

Have a lovely March & See you when I get back!

Cheers,
Mon

March 9, 2009 at 11:58 pm 2 comments

Bring Your Characters and Film to Life via Social Media

A huge thank you to Erica Hargreave for all her hard work on yesterday’s panel and to Maayan Cohen and Danika Dinsmore.

Among other subjects, Carol Sill & Erica addressed the role of “characters” in telling a story via social media.*  Gillian Shaw (who was also on the panel & was great) subsequently spoke to Carol & I about our thoughts on the subject.

being-emme

Now I rarely follow “characters” – likely because there are few television shows and fictional characters that engage me enough to follow their “activities” online.**  And with characters where it’s not clear the “person” isn’t a person, there is a certain deception involved.

It’s a double edged sword for an artist – put forth a character that makes the fictional aspect apparent and many won’t follow an “unknown” character.  Not unless they have something really interesting to say.  Which is why I do follow Emme Rogers (as do many others): she’s fun, flirty and I think the conversation that takes place around her and her exploits brings a great sense of play to Twitter.

And characters can be very useful – and exciting – both for the artist and for the storyteller.

Allowing the character to live in other platforms before the film is released – and whilst the film is being made – gives the character a larger/broader  life – and helps with publicity.

Related stories (lets call them “pre-stories”, for this point) can engage the audience and allow them to have a larger window into/to the character.  After all, any character has a life that began before the point at which the film begins.  Consider what aspects of their life you can explore and what kind of tools you could use to tell the story (video on Youtube et al., photos on Flickr, brief but enticing spurts on Twitter etc.) What parts of their story can bring more life to the character and the film?  Where were the characters 6 months before? What interactions did they have the day before? That morning?   You can see how this can be especially useful for something like a mystery/suspense project!

And, as I said in the above article (and as I have heard Monique Trottier mention with regards to books), there is no reason the end of the film needs to be the end.  I can tell you that there have been several films (Red Road, Sideways) where I was consumed with reading more about the film after seeing it. Or where I’ve seen a film numerous times. So desperate was I to stay “engaged”.

For the artist,  this process, while time-consuming, is in another sense, almost effortless.  After all, as a writer and actor, I always created a background for the characters etc. And, much as I’d love to pretend I’m special, this is pretty standard practice.  So such items can be extremely creative and satisfying – as well as a boon when it comes to building an audience.

And now, with all the tools available through social media, there’s the opportunity to give the audience more, to keep them engaged. Your creativity is the limit when it comes to where your story begins – or ends.

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Notes:

*We managed to talk about several social media topics, but there were some key things we didn’t have the time to address, so I hope we do have the opportunity to do a part 2 with this group so we can take our discussion to the next level.  Oh & Erica and Leah Nelson (who was helping out by being Linkgrrl09 and finding the sites we all talked about) decided to play this video while I spoke, to help er, demonstrate my expertise…

**However, get any or all the characters from The Office on Twitter and I will press “follow” until I develop carpal tunnel.

***I’ll be looking into the use of Alternate Reality Games for independent film projects in a future post.

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Want more articles about artists? I have a whole series here.
http://monicahamburg.wordpress.com/category/artist-series/

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Bring Your Characters and Film to Life Using Social Media” by Monica Hamburg

March 5, 2009 at 9:52 pm 13 comments

Getting the Crowd to “Make” Your Film – e.g. “Lost Zombies”

Crowdsourcing has become an exciting concept in the business world.  (I’ve explored the concept of Crowdsourcing many times before – if you’re interested in my views on the topic, the best place to look is my One Degree series.  Other posts on the topic can be found in the “Crowdsourcing” category of this blog)

What’s exciting is that some innovative filmmakers are also making use of this concept.

Several projects are now getting content from the crowds (e.g. Lost Zombies), Crowdfunding (e.g. My Million Dollar Movie), and even making an “open-sourced” feature film (e.g. Swarm of Angels (I wouldn’t recommend the latter tactic, btw, but I’ve been wrong before).

The beauty of this is that engages the audience – creates a dialogue:

“I believe the Internet has created a kind of conversation that we are all involved with.  We‘ve gotten used to that level of interaction. It‘s rewarding. Now we want that experience from our media.” Lost Zombies encourages its fans to document their own zombie encounters. In just a matter of weeks the community has grown to more than 400 active members with contributed materials flowing in from all over the world.” (- Lance Weiler.  From Filmmaker Magazine: “When The Audience Takes Control : Lance Weiler breaks down the new models independent filmmakers are using to create a fan base.”  Read this, btw – it’s excellent)

In this TCIBR podcast – Lost Zombies & Skot Leach (co-director of the film – along with his brother Ryan) (Listen on the Workbook Project site)

(Source: The Workbook Project )

Notes:
(Questions asked by Lance Weiler, responses provided by Skot Leach)
(FYI, I am paraphrasing a great deal here)
– Community Generated Zombie Film
– Film made my the crowds “Zombie Documentary”
– Audience looking for more involvement, engagement
– Wanted to get people to contribute short bursts
– Chose Zombie theme – figured that could work, be enjoyable

- Call to action?

  • Zombie site – Created in Ning
  • Users Create Profile -
  • Submit Zombie encounter in whatever format (video, pictures or any media type) – Zombie outbreaks
  • All encounters considered rumors, until more “outbreaks” of each location are submitted then considered “confirmed”

- Structure? Storyline?

  • There is a structure, storyline
  • All will be compiled into an overall film with these media
  • Will also be influenced by audience
  • Process?

-How to organize/rights w/ such a large crowd?

  • Timeline – will look at what is appropriate
  • Not clear re: distribution track, esp. w/ rights issues, will look at when complete and possibly go back and talk to content creators

- Building a community (as with gaming) economies come around them, could be release for free, but could monetize content around it?

  • Leaning towards that
  • Original vision involved ending up

- Explain Ning to those unfamiliar?

  • Blank template, like Facebook, allows you to build entire social network, invite your own users, define interface
  • Can add widgets to tweek to your needs

- Open Data portability issues? Can you pull user data, so you have it?

  • Simply put, Yes.
  • Provided Framework, but users info is yours
  • Some people joined just to be part of social network (loved Zombies), without contributing
  • Audience before content
  • Compelling enough with Ning to retain audience while you flesh out story
  • Double-edged sword – Want to tell story, point of site, and don’t necessarily want people to be so caught up in the social aspect that they ignore story

- Dealing with crowds – what has been interesting, surprising?

  • How quickly people “got it”
  • Knew ARG community likes to piece things together – wondered if horror fans would get what they should do
  • Very quickly people start
  • Tweeted Ning’s feature re location – renamed “outbreaks”
  • And then people started really working with that, posting photos, videos
  • They also found news items and related (“someone bit at a party, this seems odd? – Could this be zombie related?)
  • People discovered they could contribute in their own unique way (asking question, posting audio files, drawings, video)
  • Like a conversation

- As project grows, any plans, ideas of breaking into “real world”

  • Exploring:
    • Possibility of live video editing/mixing, remix story – so each time you see the film it’s pulled in a different way
    • Interested in “Zombie walks” – a final event where site culminates in a final live event e.g. Zombie Apocalypse where zombie walks the world (people participate by documenting etc.)

- How to get involved with this film?

  • Go to LostZombies
  • Sign up
  • - Participate – submit items or even direct story by asking questions

- Interactivity becoming norm?

  • More immersive progression. Videogames, ARGs rise shows that the audience is ready to experience these types of things
  • Audience members can determine the pace, level they participate (observe, do a little, do plenty)
  • Playful, interactive quality

- These are social experience – like theatrical –  Commununal Experience.  People falsely believe that online = alienation.  But now people are their own media company (can publish, upload video etc. and immediately can be seen around the world – just a matter of aggregating audience to it.  Mirrors theatrical, 2-way communicational.  These types of projects are very exciting.
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Want more articles about artists? I have a whole series here.
http://monicahamburg.wordpress.com/category/artist-series/

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March 4, 2009 at 7:40 am 2 comments

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Monica Hamburg – Who Am I?

Good question (I wonder this all the time).
Linkedin profile is: here.
Find out more here.

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